Monthly Archives: March 2018

How much super do I need in retirement, and how can I boost my super balance?

Knowing how much you need in retirement is more about knowing what kind of lifestyle you desire when you have retired, or, transitioning to retirement.

According to the ASFA Retirement Standard, for a single person that magic number is $545,000.

But according to the ABS – the average super balances for the entire working population1 would suggest that we are not even close to that mark, however, a closer look into the average balance by age group reveals that the average balance for men between 55-59 is $237,022 and for women it is $123,642.

 

So how can we boost our super balance?

When every dollar counts, here are a few sneaky ways to squirrel up your super balance;

  1. Make sure you’ve consolidated all of your super2 so to save on incurring multiple fees across multiple accounts. Just keep a careful eye on any nasty exit fees.
  2. We nearly all have super guarantee provided by our employer3,

How to invest in US shares and ETFs directly via an SMSF

Self-managed super funds have often been criticised for lacking diversification when it comes to their investments, specifically that SMSFs have too much in Australian shares and cash and not enough in international investments.

This criticism is somewhat unwarranted as SMSFs access international investments via Australian managed funds and ETFs.  Research from Class Super shows that the underlying exposure to international equities across the top 20 managed funds and ETFs is 57% and 58% respectively (Source: Class SMSF Benchmark Report June 2016).

A large portion of SMSF trustees desire access to international investments, namely the US as the largest financial market in the world, however investing directly has traditionally been a costly and complex exercise. Trustees face a mountain of paperwork, complex forms and typically expensive trading fees.

Looking at trading fees, the cost to an SMSF to purchase AUD $10,000 of US stocks will be anywhere from $41 to $134  ($88 on average) per trade if conducted via the international broking solutions of the big four banks (Nabtrade,

Financial Market Update | February

The month of February finished up being almost flat, a surprise after the deep selloff early in the month.

Listed property, (local referred to as A-REIT’s and global as G-REITs) was down again on the rising interest rate curve. Although one never wants to stand in front of a freight train the value now emerging in listed property starts to look interesting at these levels.  The longer term outcome will depend on bond yields.

Bonds are in the spotlight as a leading culprit in the increased volatility and the sell-off in the aforementioned A-REITs. The ten year US bond yields that we discussed at length in last months post continued to rise, peaking at 2.94% on 21 February. The yields appear to have run into some resistance at that level, but this could be merely a consolidating pause.

During the month, the S&P 500 index of US shares had a loss of 11.83%, which takes it into the ‘correction’ territory.

Contributing the sale of your home into Superannuation

In the May 2017 budget, the Government announced that from 1 July 2018, older Australians could contribute up $300,000 each (per couple) from the sale of their family home into their Superannuation Fund. This measure is to encourage older people to downsize from family homes that no longer meet their needs, while also freeing up these homes to younger families starting out.

 

Do you pass the test to contribute the sale of your home into your Superannuation?

Currently the rules state that if you are over 65 years of age, then you cannot contribute into Superannuation unless you meet the “work test” (meaning you have worked at least 40 hours in a 30-day period and been paid for this service). If you do meet the work test, then you can only contribute up to $100,000 in after-tax contributions, and $25,000 in before-tax contributions.

Another layer of complexity to this is that even if you are over 65 in age,