Monthly Archives: December 2017

Financial Market Update: A Review of November’s Performance

The S&P/ASX200 Accumulation has now put in two solid months, following the October gain of 4.01% with another 1.64% in November. Twelve month returns are 14.61% almost double our expected annual 12 month returns of around 8.5%. This surge may have pulled forward some of the next twelve months expected gains.

 

Global Markets

Global markets also posted a good month, with gains of 3.24% and three month gains now at 11.33%. Emerging Markets, which we have favoured in our Managed Portfolios, are up 29.27% over the last year. We mentioned in the last update that Emerging Markets remain somewhat cheaper than developed markets, with arguably more to gain from structural reforms and demographic changes.

 

Real Estate Trusts

The A-REIT sector (real-estate trusts) saw gains of 5.29% for the month of November. This sector is coming back into favour after a sell-off based on concerns about higher bond rates and the arrival of Amazon which may (or may not) further hollow out the Australian retail sector.

Bitcoin and crypto-currency investment in an SMSF

The recent surge in the price of Bitcoin has many investors seriously looking at crypto-currency as a part of their SMSF investment portfolio.

So, can an SMSF invest in bitcoin and crypto currency, and if so, what must trustees and advisers be aware of?

There are a number of key areas that trustees need to consider and address if they are looking if invest their SMSF monies into Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies / crypto-assets.

 

Is it allowable under the SMSF trust deed?

For any investment to be allowed, it must specifically be enabled and included in the trust deed of the SMSF. As Bitcoin and other crypto-assets are part of a relatively new asset class, it is unlikely that most SMSF deed would include a provision for investing into these currencies.

The ATO’s view is the Bitcoin and other crypto-assets are NOT currencies:

“Our view is that bitcoin is neither money nor a foreign currency,

Desired Lifestyle vs. Realistic Living in Retirement for SMSF Trustees

When planning for retirement, it’s important to understand your SMSF household needs, and outline your goals with your adviser.

The latest report on the financial health of SMSF trustees heading into retirement has found that the amount needed for a 65-year-old couple to afford a comfortable retirement has risen by 17 percent from $702,000 in the previous year to $824,000.

Unfortunately, this report has also found that one in four are unlikely to achieve their SMSF goals.

 

Realistic wealth goals for SMSF trustees

Of course, achieving your ideal lifestyle is easier if you start with more wealth. The direct link is the greater level of initial wealth, the higher chance an SMSF household will be able to live their desired lifestyle in retirement.

The last seven years has seen a rising trend of median SMSF balances, but recent weak investment markets have resulted in low returns, and only a small increase. This brings the median balance for two member SMSFs to $1,137,000 with the median imputed investment return of 1.0 percent,

Financial Market Update: A Review of October’s Performance

The S&P/ASX200 Accumulation index finally put in a surge in October, with a gain of 4.01% in the month, shaking off a 6 month malaise. Twelve month numbers are back up to 16.13% almost double our expected annual 12 month returns of around 8.5%.

 

Global Markets

Global markets also had a good month, with gains of 4.29% and a rolling 12 month return that tops the charts at 22.53%. Emerging Markets posted even higher returns with a gain of 5.92% in October, and one year returns of 25.49%. Although vulnerable to negative events in the short term, Emerging Markets remain somewhat cheaper than developed markets, with arguably more to gain from structural reforms and demographic changes.

 

Bond Markets

Bond markets improved in October, posting a gain of 1.09% on average. However one year gains are still muted at 1.64%, held back by long bond yields that are drifting higher, albeit at a slow pace.